20 Codes That Have NEVER Been Deciphered: What do They Mean?!?

Humans have advanced incredibly throughout the years, but there are still a few things we haven’t figured out. Take for example, these puzzles that although have been around for decades and centuries, have actually never been figured out by anyone!

#1. Voynich Manuscript: This is allegedly 600 years old and completely handwritten in an undecipherable language possibly a medical textbook.

Voynich Manuscript This is allegedly 600 years old and completely handwritten in an undecipherable language, possibly a medical textbook.

#2. Vinca/Old European: A collection of symbols were found on artifacts from between 6000 to 4500 BC. It is not known if these symbols are a writing system.

Vinca  Old European A collection of symbols were found on artifacts from between 6,000 to 4,500 BC. It’s not known if these symbols are a writing system.

#3. The Phaistos Disk: This circular clay tablet is about six inches across discovered in the early 1900s. This alphabet could possible help decipher Linear A.

The Phaistos Disk This circular clay tablet is about six inches across, discovered in the early 1900s. This alphabet could possibly help decipher Linear A.

#4. Shugborough Inscription: These letters were carved into stone in Shugborough Hall in Staffordshire England. No one knows why or what their meaning is.

Shugborough Inscription These letters were carved into stone in Shugborough Hall in Staffordshire, England. No one knows why or what their meaning is.

#5. Rohonc Codex: Name after a city in western Hungary, it was written in an unknown language.

Rohonc Codex Named after a city in western Hungary, it was written in an unknown language.

#6. Richard Feynman’s Challenge Ciphers: In 1987, a Caltech professor named Richard Feynman was given three samples of code by a colleague. Only one was ever solved.

RIchard Feynman’s Challenge Ciphers In 1987, a Caltech professor named Richard Feynman was given three samples of code by a colleague. Only one was ever solved.

#7. Proto Elamite: This script first appeared in 2900 BC in South-Western Iran. It has yet to be deciphered.

Proto-Elamite This script first appeared in 2,900 BC in south western Iran. It has yet to be deciphered.

#8. Pigeon Cipher: There was an unsolved WWII message found attached to the remains of a pigeon which were found in a chimney.

Pigeon Cipher There was an unsolved WWII message found attached to the remains of a pigeon (which were found in a chimney).

#9. Navajo Code Talkers: During WWII the alliens used Navajo Indians in order to send encrypted messages. Because the language is so difficult normally, the code was never broken.

Navajo Code Talkers During WWII, the Allies used Navajo Indians in order to send encrypted messages. Because the language is so difficult normally, the code was never broken.

#10. Kryptos: In 1900 a sculpture with a 4 sections of encryptions was installed at the CIA headquarters. The 4th section has not been solved.

Kryptos In 1990, a sculpture with 4 sections of encryptions was installed at the CIA headquarters. The 4th section has not been solved.

#11. Indus Script: The Indus Valley civilization existed in 2600 to 1800 BC and they left behind thousands of objects inscribed with pictograph scriptis.

Indus Script The Indus Valley civilization existed in 2600 to 1800 BC, and they left behind thousands of objects inscribed with pictograph scripts.

#12. Enigma Encryption System: This popular encryption mechanism used by Germany in WWII resulted in some messages that couldn’t ever be deciphered.

Enigma Encryption System This popular encryption mechanism used by Germany in WWII resulted in some messages that couldn’t ever be deciphered.

#13. Dorabella Cipher: In 1897 composer Edward Elgar sent this encrypted message to a 23 year old friend Dorra Penny. It has not yet been solved.

Dorabella Cipher In 1897, composer Edward Elgar sent this encrypted message to a 23 year-old friend, Dora Penny. It hasn’t been solved.

#14. D’Agapeyeff Cipher: Alexander D’Agapeyeff wrote a book on cryptography in 1939 including this challegnge cypher. Not even he could solve it.

D’Agapeyeff Cipher Alexander d’Agapeyeff wrote a book on cryptography in 1939 including this challenge cypher. Not even he could solve it.

#15. Chinese Gold Bar Ciphers: In 1933, seven gold bars were issued to General Wang in Shanghai containing pictures writing cryptograms and Latin letters.

Chinese Gold Bar Ciphers In 1933, seven gold bars were issued to General Wang in Shanghai, containing pictures, writing, cryptograms and Latin letters.

#16. Chaocipher: It’s not technically unsolved, but no one knows why it was in author J.F. Byrne’s autobiography.

Chaocipher It’s not technically unsolved, but no one knows why is was in author J.F. Byrne’s autobiography.

#17. Blitz Ciphers: These were discovered during WWII in a bombed cellar in East London. They depict 50 calligraphic symbols – possibly 18th century Freemason ciphers.

Blitz Ciphers These were discovered during WWII in a bombed cellar in East London. They depict 50 calligraphic symbols… possibly 18th century Freemason ciphers.

#18. Bellaso Ciphers – Bellaso, a 16th century Italian cryptologist is responsible for many techniques used today and many of his “challenge” ciphers have yet to be solved.

Bellaso Ciphers Bellaso, a 16th century Italian cryptologist, is responsible for many techniques used today and many of his “challenge” ciphers have yet to be solved.

#19. Beale Ciphers – In 1885 a small pamphlet was published in Virginia containing encrypted messages. They were supposed to lead to a treasure but were never solved.

Beale Ciphers In 1885, a small pamphlet was published in Virginia containing encrypted messages. They were supposed to lead to a treasure, but were never solved.

#20. Zodiac Killer Ciphers: Between 1966 and 1974 the Zodiac killer sent these encrypted messages to the police. Many remain unsolved.

Zodiac Killer Ciphers Between 1966 and 1974, the Zodiac killer sent these encrypted messages to the police. Many remain unsolved.

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